Selfie …. A Disease

 

 

 

why do people take photos of face themselves, view and call this disease a selfie?

HoSelfie-Design-Elementw many photos of you are on your phone right now?These days, humans take almost 1 trillion photos a year. (To put that into context, that’s more photos every few minutes than in the entire 19th century.)

And lots of these photos are selfies—self-portraits, usually taken with a smartphone. As of this writing, nearly 300 million Instagram photos had been tagged with the selfie label.

We love getting into the “whys” of social media psychology, so in this post I set out to discover why we love taking photos of ourselves—and why we love viewing selfies.

What does “selfie culture” say about the world we’re living in now, and how can viewing photos of others help us make better decisions and even understand one another better? Read on for the full psychology of selfies.

psychology of selfies

 

Number of photos taken in 2014 will approach 1 trillion thanks to selfie explosion

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2013 was the year of the selfie, according to the Oxford English Dictionary — but self-snaps aren’t going anywhere anytime soon.

 

i had the urge to study a blog about selfies  So self-portraits are about self-image—how we define ourselves.

They’re also a way to figure out who we are. The “looking-glass self” is a psychological concept that says that how we see ourselves doesn’t come from who we really are, but rather from how we think others see us.


And now that we can

A) take a selfie in mere moments, and

B) share them with thousands of people online at any time, the impact that others have on our self-value has increased.

 

Social media is no exception: Face-tracking studies show that the profile picture or avatar is the first place the eye is drawn to on Facebook and other social media profiles. (Want advice on creating a stellar profile pic?

here-s-how-people-look-at-your-facebook-profile-literally-7346ff71cc

On Instagram, pictures with human faces are 38 percent more likely to receive likes and 32 percent more likely to attract comments than photos with no faces.

face photos stat

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